Alisha Denomme

Declarations, design, and sometimes donuts.

If you want to foster those creative, problem solving skills, the solution isn’t learning to code – it’s learning to paint. Or play an instrument. Or write poetry. Or sculpt. The field doesn’t matter: the key thing is that if you want to foster your own innovative creativity, the best way to do it is to seriously pursue an artistic endeavor.

In the history of the Nobel Prize, nearly every Laureate has pursued the arts. According to research by psychologists Michele and Robert Root-Bernstein, “almost all Nobel laureates in the sciences actively engage in arts as adults. They are twenty-five times as likely as the average scientist to sing, dance, or act; seventeen times as likely to be a visual artist; twelve times more likely to write poetry and literature; eight times more likely to do woodworking or some other craft; four times as likely to be a musician; and twice as likely to be a photographer.”

Perhaps you don’t need to learn to code.

For a testament to the Nobel observation, see Richard Feynman’s sketches and drawings. We also know that Einstein worked out some of his most difficult physics problems while playing violin

(via explore-blog)

PRSA Wis YP 2013 Yearbook2013 Yearbook for PRSA Young Pros of Wisconsin. Designed by myself. Illustrations by Autumn Brown.

PRSA Wis YP 2013 Yearbook
2013 Yearbook for PRSA Young Pros of Wisconsin. Designed by myself. Illustrations by Autumn Brown.

Because Internet »

allthingslinguistic:

I did an interview with CBC Spark earlier this week about the “because x” construction and other internet language phenomena, including “I can’t even/I’ve lost the ability to can”, the general pattern of stylized verbal incoherence mirroring emotional incoherence, and the porous boundary between “slang” language and “canon” language. (Dear tumblr: does that mean that slang is like the fanfic of language? Because I support this.)

It was a lot of fun, and now the interview is finally up! So you can hear me talking to Nora Young as part of a longer podcast/radio show (Spark in general is about technology and culture and it’s pretty great). It’s up right now on the CBC website, or on iTunes, or on CBC radio/SiriusXM on Sunday at 1pm local time in most Canadian/American timezones if you like radios. 

For more on internet language, check out the original “because reasons” post that started it all, my more recent update on where I think the “because x” construction came from, and this list of all my internet language posts. There’s also a previous Spark interview with David Crystal on internet language.